Monthly deforestation, degradation, and wildfire scar data for the Brazilian Amazon

Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) publishes land use change data on a monthly basis using its DETER-B system (Sistema de Detecção do Desmatamento na Amazônia Legal em Tempo Real). Below is a table with the monthly data since the system went public in August 2016. All figures are square kilometers.

Last update: 2021-Nov-17

Month Deforestation Degradation Deforestation with Exposed Soil Deforestation with Vegetation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut Type 1+2
Aug 2016 1025.1 1673.8 1009.7 13.1 2.3 9285.8 539.5
Sep 2016 691.4 472.2 687.1 1.4 3.0 4244.3 275.9
Oct 2016 749.8 899.7 739.0 1.9 8.9 4081.9 292.0
Nov 2016 367.1 354.1 363.2 2.2 1.6 569.1 147.5
Dec 2016 16.5 8.5 16.5 0.0 0.0 13.5 0.0
Jan 2017 58.2 14.3 58.2 0.0 0.0 10.2 0.0
Feb 2017 101.3 12.2 101.2 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.2
Mar 2017 74.2 23.2 73.6 0.2 0.4 5.2 0.5
Apr 2017 126.9 40.1 121.3 4.0 1.6 2.9 0.7
May 2017 363.5 128.3 340.3 7.8 15.4 4.1 61.1
Jun 2017 608.3 128.2 504.0 84.8 19.4 75.0 53.6
Jul 2017 457.7 156.6 407.9 47.5 2.3 40.0 131.1
Aug 2017 289.1 278.0 286.9 0.8 1.4 101.6 262.1
Sep 2017 411.4 339.5 409.5 0.0 1.9 7757.8 165.7
Oct 2017 456.5 427.6 452.9 0.6 3.0 6857.8 178.4
Nov 2017 359.7 199.9 352.9 3.1 3.6 1843.2 398.4
Dec 2017 293.7 264.5 284.3 4.9 4.4 1152.0 125.2
Jan 2018 184.8 247.7 151.7 27.5 5.7 1626.0 63.6
Feb 2018 151.6 96.6 144.3 6.9 0.4 420.1 0.0
Mar 2018 362.6 253.8 324.3 33.9 4.4 534.6 110.6
Apr 2018 518.7 289.1 445.9 62.2 10.5 854.3 99.8
May 2018 558.6 247.5 457.8 80.1 20.6 323.1 131.7
Jun 2018 520.8 612.1 433.5 71.0 16.3 478.7 223.0
Jul 2018 620.4 737.4 585.5 24.0 10.8 212.9 221.1
Aug 2018 529.9 355.2 497.5 22.1 10.2 793.5 165.2
Sep 2018 728.6 373.7 710.3 12.3 6.0 1425.7 448.5
Oct 2018 497.9 232.5 477.3 13.7 7.0 156.0 160.5
Nov 2018 265.6 84.0 261.4 4.0 0.2 12.3 125.7
Dec 2018 67.0 14.9 63.1 3.4 0.5 0.0 9.3
Jan 2019 140.9 75.4 135.4 4.8 0.6 34.5 46.2
Feb 2019 136.7 25.0 116.9 14.0 5.8 20.6 12.2
Mar 2019 242.4 80.2 227.4 15 0 470.5 0
Apr 2019 237.8 115.2 224.6 13.2 0 682.5 0
May 2019 736.8 197 619.1 83.1 34.6 69.7 111
Jun 2019 932.1 121.3 849.9 69.5 12.7 667.7 202.7
Jul 2019 2115.2 675.2 1866.3 226.1 22.8 753.7 382.5
Aug 2019 1701.49 481 1665.49 30 6 1483.99 881
Sep 2019 1447.4 423.46 1430.67 12.87 3.86 4022.95 610.66
Oct 2019 554.77 333.6 545.14 6.66 2.97 541.81 219.05
Nov 2019 523.42 102.14 510.89 5.87 6.66 136.08 461.74
Dec 2019 189.52 33.93 183.02 4.05 2.45 15.02 52.1
Jan 2020 283.76 95.76 263.74 14.69 5.33 8.01 182.49
Feb 2020 185.55 16.18 179.84 1.7 4.01 14.25 63.48
Mar 2020 326.51 27.88 317.36 5.46 3.69 2.31 0.8
Apr 2020 405.61 41.24 391.27 8.95 5.39 14.81 27.59
May 2020 829.9 38.49 798.97 23.25 7.68 19.3 63.68
Jun 2020 1034.4 236.05 914.99 97.55 21.86 13.39 147.82
Jul 2020 1654.32 377.08 1573.88 56.79 23.65 293.48 782.44
Aug 2020 1358.78 288.06 1335.11 7.74 15.93 799.35 885.44
Sep 2020 964.45 241.35 953.93 3.32 7.2 9924.31 645.81
Oct 2020 836.23 274.66 832.65 0.84 2.74 3397.53 700.07
Nov 2020 310.35 91.96 306.12 3.68 0.55 734.23 157.35
Dec 2020 216.33 58 212.93 0.9 2.5 127.67 74.98
Jan 2021 85.74 26.73 85.17 0 0.57 32.89 17.1
Feb 2021 124.51 19.06 120.59 1.71 2.21 0 19.99
Mar 2021 162.77 36.68 155.61 0.48 6.68 5.06 43.91
Apr 2021 580.55 92.49 561.98 8.7 9.87 24.52 73.57
May 2021 1391 331.14 1303.47 49.75 37.78 27.52 290.11
Jun 2021 1061.88 354.06 1007 30.41 24.47 192.84 503.85
Jul 2021 1497.93 474.83 1468.61 13.3 16.02 118.52 743.96
Aug 2021 918.24 455.26 907.03 4.01 7.2 1001.41 617.78
Sep 2021 984.61 424.32 977.05 1.07 6.49 1240.3 1145.1
Oct 2021 876.56 241.3 862.83 5.21 8.52 566.59 690.47

 


 

  • Amazon to Alps: Swiss gold imports from Brazil tread a legal minefield

    - The Brazilian Amazon is experiencing a new and potentially catastrophic gold rush driven by increased international demand for the precious metal.- Over the past year, an estimated $1.2 billion worth of gold has been exported from Brazil to Switzerland, making it the second-largest export market for the country’s gold, after Canada. About a fifth of this gold comes from the Amazon, according to official figures.- The scale of Brazil’s gold exports to Switzerland has raised concerns among environmental and transparency advocates that a significant quantity of illicit gold from the Amazon may be entering global supply chains.

  • Pesticides released into Brazil’s Amazon to degrade rainforest and facilitate deforestation

    - Chemicals created to kill agricultural pests are being sprayed by aircraft into native forest areas.- Glyphosate and 2,4-D, among others, cause the trees to defoliate, and end up weakened or dead in a process that takes months. Next criminals remove the remaining trees more easily and drop grass seeds by aircraft, consolidating deforestation.- Brazil’s environmental agency, IBAMA, discovered that in addition to land grabbers, cattle ranchers use the method in order to circumvent forest monitoring efforts.

  • Brazil’s illegal gold rush is fueling corruption, violent crime and deforestation

    - Once the epicenter of the global trade in gold, illegal mining is once again surging across the Amazon.- Its extraction and trade is not only fueling corruption, money laundering and criminal violence – it is accelerating deforestation in the world’s largest tropical forest, says Robert Muggah, co-founder of the Igarapé Institute.- Muggah details a range of challenges facing efforts to rein in the gold mining sector. He says political leadership is critical to make progress on the issue: “Absent political will from the top, however, Brazil’s gold chain will continue to resemble the wild west.”

  • Cattle boom in Brazil’s Acre spells doom for Amazon rainforest, activists warn

    - Government data show the number of cattle in Acre, a state in the Brazilian Amazon, increased by 8.3% in 2020, putting the state’s herd size at more than 3.8 million, or four times its human population.- The cattle industry is a key driver of Acre’s economy, and aligns with the state’s aims of promoting and expanding agricultural development within the region.- However, activists say they’re concerned the increase will lead to further environmental damage in the state, which this year recorded its highest deforestation rate in 18 years.- Experts say Acre’s cattle growth is currently not sustainable and will lead to further deforestation in the Amazon unless sustainable solutions are encouraged and implemented.

  • Tom Lovejoy’s enduring legacy to the planet

    - Conservation biologist Tom Lovejoy died on Christmas day, 2021 at the age of 80.- Through his innovative ideas, leadership, and advocacy, Lovejoy leaves an enduring legacy to the field of conservation, writes Jeremy Hance.- “Among career highlights, Lovejoy published one of the first estimates of global extinction rates in 1980; invented the debt-for-nature swap, a massive boon to conservation areas the world over; he helped raise awareness of the plight of rainforests worldwide, and the Amazon in particular, during the 1980s during the peak save-the-rainforest movement; and he was an advisor to the PBS program, NATURE,” Hance writes.- “Lovejoy’s work lives on, not only through his fragments project in Brazil, but through years of advising and collaborating with other researchers, celebrities and world leaders, including four US presidents, to preserve the ecological integrity of our natural world.”

  • Rainforests in 2022: A look at the year ahead

    - Between rising deforestation in the Amazon, new financial and political commitments to reduce deforestation, and growing interest in “nature-based solutions” like conservation and reforestation, 2021 may prove to have been a fateful year for the world’s tropical rainforests.- So what should we expect in 2022? Mongabay Founder Rhett A. Butler provides a brief look at what may be some of the major storylines for tropical forests in the coming year.- He picks 12 issues to watch, ranging from the post-COVID recovery to carbon markets to geopolitics.

  • Mongabay’s 10 hardest-hitting investigations of 2021

    - Mongabay published numerous deep-dive investigations this year, some of them data-driven and others relying on on-the-ground interviews, to hold companies and governments accountable.- The investigations ranged from Brazil to China to Nigeria, covering a wide range of issues, from deforestation to workers’ rights and discrimination against Indigenous peoples.- In this article, Mongabay looks at some of the most impactful investigations from 2021.

  • Mongabay’s top Amazon stories from 2021

    - The world’s largest rainforest continued to come under pressure in 2021, due largely to the policies of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro.- Deforestation rates hit a 15-year-high, while fires flared up again, combining to turn Brazil’s portion of the Amazon into a net carbon source for the first time ever.- The rainforest as a whole remains a net carbon sink, thanks to conservation areas and Indigenous territories, where deforestation rates remained low.- Indigenous communities continued to be hit by a barrage of outside pressure, from COVID-19 to illegal miners and land grabbers, while community members living in Brazil’s cities dealt with persistent prejudice.

  • ‘Rampant forest destruction’ wracks reserve as cattle ranching advances in Brazilian Amazon

    - The Terra do Meio Ecological Station comprises some 3.37 million hectares in the Brazilian Amazon state of Pará, and is home to hundreds of species – including some that are threatened with extinction.- But despite its protected status, Terra do Meio has come under growing pressure, with satellite data showing deforestation doubling in 2021.- Environmentalists say the destruction within Terra do Meio is being driven by illegal loggers, cattle ranchers and land speculators spilling over from the neighboring Área de Proteção Ambiental (APA) Triunfo do Xingu, a sustainable use reserve that has become the most deforested slice of the Brazilian Amazon in recent years.- Pending legislation could make it even easier to legalize illegitimate land claims, providing hope to land speculators and cattle ranchers that they could soon receive land titles for land they have deforested and occupied illegally.

  • The year in rainforests 2021

    - 2021 was a year where tropical forests featured more prominently in global headlines than normal thanks to rising recognition of the role they play in addressing climate change and biodiversity loss.- Despite speculation in the early months of the pandemic that slowing economic activity might diminish forest clearing, loss of both primary forests and tree cover in the tropics accelerated between 2019 and 2020. We don’t yet know how much forest was cut down in 2021, but early indications like rising deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon suggest that forest loss will be on the high end of the range from the past decade.- The following is a look at some of the major tropical rainforest storylines from 2021. It is not an exhaustive review.