Monthly deforestation, degradation, and wildfire scar data for the Brazilian Amazon

Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) publishes land use change data on a monthly basis using its DETER-B system (Sistema de Detecção do Desmatamento na Amazônia Legal em Tempo Real). Below is a table with the monthly data since the system went public in August 2016. All figures are square kilometers.

Last update: 2022-Aug-20

Month Deforestation Degradation Deforestation with Exposed Soil Deforestation with Vegetation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut Type 1+2
Aug 2016 1025.1 1673.8 1009.7 13.1 2.3 9285.8 539.5
Sep 2016 691.4 472.2 687.1 1.4 3.0 4244.3 275.9
Oct 2016 749.8 899.7 739.0 1.9 8.9 4081.9 292.0
Nov 2016 367.1 354.1 363.2 2.2 1.6 569.1 147.5
Dec 2016 16.5 8.5 16.5 0.0 0.0 13.5 0.0
Jan 2017 58.2 14.3 58.2 0.0 0.0 10.2 0.0
Feb 2017 101.3 12.2 101.2 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.2
Mar 2017 74.2 23.2 73.6 0.2 0.4 5.2 0.5
Apr 2017 126.9 40.1 121.3 4.0 1.6 2.9 0.7
May 2017 363.5 128.3 340.3 7.8 15.4 4.1 61.1
Jun 2017 608.3 128.2 504.0 84.8 19.4 75.0 53.6
Jul 2017 457.7 156.6 407.9 47.5 2.3 40.0 131.1
Aug 2017 289.1 278.0 286.9 0.8 1.4 101.6 262.1
Sep 2017 411.4 339.5 409.5 0.0 1.9 7757.8 165.7
Oct 2017 456.5 427.6 452.9 0.6 3.0 6857.8 178.4
Nov 2017 359.7 199.9 352.9 3.1 3.6 1843.2 398.4
Dec 2017 293.7 264.5 284.3 4.9 4.4 1152.0 125.2
Jan 2018 182.6 206.6 149.6 27.3 5.7 1589.7 71.9
Feb 2018 146.3 96.2 139.0 6.9 0.4 406.6 0.0
Mar 2018 356.6 246.1 318.4 33.7 4.4 507.5 110.6
Apr 2018 489.5 280.3 428.0 51.8 9.7 710.6 95.8
May 2018 549.9 239.8 452.1 78.2 19.5 313.2 130.7
Jun 2018 488.2 569.1 407.0 66.9 14.3 467.5 218.9
Jul 2018 596.3 700.9 562.4 24.1 9.8 199.0 188.0
Aug 2018 525.9 325.7 494.6 22.2 9.1 616.3 130.6
Sep 2018 746.0 306.5 728.6 12.2 5.3 1294.4 372.6
Oct 2018 526.2 196.5 505.7 13.8 6.7 136.2 135.2
Nov 2018 276.9 66.3 271.5 5.2 0.2 12.3 124.0
Dec 2018 67.2 8.4 63.5 3.4 0.4 0.0 9.3
Jan 2019 136.1 49.4 130.6 4.9 0.6 33.9 42.7
Feb 2019 138.1 19.8 118.6 14.2 5.3 18.1 8.6
Mar 2019 251.48 41.63 233.81 16.09 1.58 473.44 48.26
Apr 2019 247.39 70.25 229.79 13.91 3.69 679.78 9.32
May 2019 738.56 60.91 623.06 81.03 34.47 58.38 57.53
Jun 2019 934.81 58.48 854.27 67.98 12.56 656.94 183.74
Jul 2019 2255.33 520.55 2005.49 225.86 23.98 722.68 389.26
Aug 2019 1714.31 374.96 1675.38 32.08 6.85 1380.99 847.91
Sep 2019 1453.64 331.04 1436.15 13.65 3.84 3851.01 599.54
Oct 2019 555.27 313.29 545.64 6.66 2.97 516.74 217.35
Nov 2019 562.8 101.27 548.56 7.17 7.07 151.8 490.54
Dec 2019 189.94 29.14 183.37 4.04 2.53 13.99 46.13
Jan 2020 284.28 89.27 264.49 14.69 5.1 7.83 173.67
Feb 2020 185.73 13.07 180.04 1.71 3.98 14.07 62.8
Mar 2020 326.94 23.51 317.79 5.46 3.69 1.88 0.8
Apr 2020 407.2 27.34 392.86 8.95 5.39 14.53 27.59
May 2020 833.57 18.41 802.64 23.25 7.68 19.16 54.04
Jun 2020 1043.23 167.81 923.83 97.55 21.85 12.76 138.24
Jul 2020 1658.97 328.48 1578.53 56.79 23.65 287.25 717.31
Aug 2020 1353.89 241.49 1330.36 7.74 15.79 773.7 854.66
Sep 2020 962.55 204.75 952.03 3.32 7.2 9824.12 623.59
Oct 2020 835.72 252.12 832.14 0.84 2.74 3358.84 680.26
Nov 2020 309.76 87.83 305.53 3.68 0.55 731.23 148.76
Dec 2020 215.42 49.18 212.02 0.9 2.5 127.36 69.85
Jan 2021 82.88 21.19 82.31 0 0.57 32.43 17.1
Feb 2021 122.8 7.14 120.59 0 2.21 6.52 19.99
Mar 2021 367.61 34.87 361.15 0.29 6.17 22.62 25.06
Apr 2021 579.98 54.59 561.41 8.7 9.87 23.86 73.43
May 2021 1390.12 232.63 1302.88 49.3 37.94 26.65 284.99
Jun 2021 1061.37 243.65 1006.49 30.41 24.47 190.35 470.97
Jul 2021 1497.93 367.28 1468.61 13.3 16.02 117.73 733.7
Aug 2021 918.24 355.08 907.03 4.01 7.2 986.25 602.94
Sep 2021 984.61 346.11 977.05 1.07 6.49 1222.28 1112.34
Oct 2021 876.56 220.66 862.83 5.21 8.52 558.37 677.44
Nov 2021 249.49 61.24 247.58 1.37 0.54 43.12 72.91
Dec 2021 87.19 10.92 85.88 0 1.31 0.94 19.05
Jan 2022 430.44 49.84 426.96 0 3.48 26.49 99.14
Feb 2022 198.67 16.72 195.74 0.46 2.47 7.21 8.72
Mar 2022 312.23 38.89 309.36 0.4 2.47 11.03 16.33
Apr 2022 1026.35 160.17 1012.82 4.67 8.86 14.72 49.99
May 2022 899.64 160.41 884 6.19 9.45 1.22 114.58
Jun 2022 1120.2 154.5 1103.29 5.14 11.77 3.04 278.28
Jul 2022 1486.71 521.74 1405.85 68.88 11.98 772.88 1319.96

 


 

  • In Brazilian Amazon, mining harm comes from beyond just the mines, study shows

    - A new land-use-change model suggests that the indirect impacts of mining operations in the Brazilian Amazon have been grossly underestimated.- Impacts include not only deforestation but also loss of biodiversity, contamination of water sources, and health hazards for the Indigenous peoples living in the area.- The calculation comes after years of government attempts to change existing regulations on protected areas and open them up to exploration.- New roads opened for mining could cause 40 times more deforestation than the mines themselves, wiping out an area almost the size of Puerto Rico in the RENCA protected area in the northern Amazon.

  • U.N. report calls for the ban of mercury trade and its use in gold mining

    - Small-scale gold mining is the key driver of global mercury demand, according to a U.N. report on the highly toxic metal, with South America accounting for 39% of this demand.- Hair samples taken from Indigenous communities in the Bolivian and Brazilian Amazonian regions showed mercury levels in excess of the safe limit prescribed by the World Health Organization.- In Brazil specifically, mercury use has risen with the boom in illegal mining that has been largely overlooked — and in some cases even encouraged — by the government of President Jair Bolsonaro.

  • 2022 Amazon fires tightly tied to recent deforestation, new data show

    - Nearly 1,000 major fires burned in the Amazon during its 2022 fire season, according to the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP).- The Brazilian Amazon accounted for the vast majority of the fires, and most burned in recently deforested areas.- MAAP uses unique satellite data detecting aerosol emissions alongside regular heat alerts, which helps filter out small fires.- Fires clearing logging debris are linked to soy-driven deforestation in some Brazilian Amazon areas, where many soy-trading companies have not signed zero-deforestation commitments.

  • Report offers a road map to restore the rule of law in the Brazilian Amazon

    - Brazilian president-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva will have to supercharge many of the same policies that he employed in his first two terms to bring Amazon destruction rates down from their record highs, a new report says.- The report, by a group of development, security and conservation think tanks, lists 92 proposals for Lula when he takes office at the start of 2023, centered around ending the culture of criminal impunity that flourished under the outgoing president, Jair Bolsonaro.- Experts say the absence of law enforcement in the Amazon has strengthened a criminal ecosystem that profits from land grabbing, illegal logging, mining, and wildlife and drug trafficking.- The Bolsonaro administration has encouraged this in large part by weakening environmental enforcement agencies and putting loyalists in their top posts.

  • Following the impacts of palm oil alliance: Violated regulations and penalty proceedings

    - The journalistic partnership behind a 2021 database gathering information on the penalties for environmental violations given to palm oil producers in Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Honduras has added two more countries: Costa Rica and Brazil- In these six Latin American nations, between 2010 and 2021, at least 298 cases were opened against 170 companies and individuals involved in the palm oil industry, according to the details offered by authorities in response to requests from the journalists working on the database.- The handing over of incomplete documents and lack of information are, once again, a common feature of how authorities across the region respond to journalists’ requests. In 181 cases, it was impossible to understand the stage of the penalty proceedings, while in 42 cases there was no concrete information on whether a sanction or fine had been applied. In 47 instances, the exact nature of the environmental violation committed by the target of the proceedings was not specified.

  • Brazil’s new environmental future under Lula: Q&A with Marina Silva

    - Considered for Brazil’s Ministry of the Environment, environmentalist Marina Silva says in an interview with Mongabay that the election of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva means a new cycle of prosperity for the country, “when it will be possible to make the transition to a new development model that is capable of fighting inequality with democracy and sustainability.”- “Part of the agribusiness sector is realizing that this practice by Bolsonaro is bad for business,” the congresswoman-elect said about the possibility of reconciling the environmental agenda and the demands of agribusiness.- Silva stressed that the current challenges are much greater than those faced when she was a member of Lula’s first administration in 2003: “We are not going to become sustainable in the blink of an eye. It’s a transition.”

  • In final days before Bolsonaro’s defeat, deforestation boomed in Brazil

    - According to data published today by Brazil’s national space research agency INPE, deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon amounted to 904 square kilometers in October, a 3% increase over last year.- Year to date, INPE’s deforestation alert system has detected 9,494 square kilometers of forest clearing, 20% more than 2021.- The figures came less than two weeks after Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva narrowly defeated Jair Bolsonaro in a run off election. Lula, who presided over a sharp drop in Amazon forest deforestation during his terms in office between 2003 and 2010, made saving the Amazon a key part of his bid for the presidency.- In contrast, Bolsonaro has overseen a steep rise in deforestation, which hit a 15-year high last year.

  • Deforestation is pushing Amazon to ‘point of no return’: WWF report

    - A new report from the World Wildlife Fund, called the Living Amazon Report, warns that threats to the Amazon have gotten worse in recent years, and could result in the disappearance of the biome if more drastic action isn’t taken.- Around 18% of Amazon forests are lost and another 17% are highly degraded, the report said.- If more drastic action isn’t taken, the report said the biome could transition from forest to savanna and push global warming above the safe threshold of 1.5°C.

  • Growing soy on cattle pasture can eliminate Amazon deforestation in Brazil

    - Expanding soy cultivation into underutilized cattle pastureland would help prevent massive deforestation and carbon emissions compared to the current practice of clearing new forest for farmland, a new study says.- Experts say that Brazil, the world’s No. 1 soy producer and beef exporter, has enough pastureland lying unused that would allow soy production to increase by more than a third without any further deforestation.- Researchers warn that if Brazil continues with its current method of soy cultivation, it would end up clearing 5.7 million hectares (14 million acres) of Amazon rainforest and Cerrado savanna into cropland over the next 15 years.- Environmentalists have welcomed intensifying agriculture as a solution to deforestation, but have raised concerns about the potential for increased pesticide use, biodiversity loss, and the expansion of cattle ranching into forested areas.

  • Bolsonaro loses election but finds big support in Amazon Arc of Deforestation

    - In a close runoff, incumbent Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro was defeated in his reelection bid against former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.- Bolsonaro, however, won in eight of the 10 Brazilian municipalities with the biggest deforestation rates in the Amazon forest last year.- Bolsonaro won in the majority of the 256 municipalities in the Arc of Deforestation, which accounts for about 75% of the deforestation in the Amazon, as well as in Novo Progresso, in Pará, where ranchers, loggers and land-grabbers orchestrated a significant burning of deforested areas in 2019.- Historical, economic, social and religious elements explain the preference for Bolsonaro in a swath of Brazilian territory where people have been encouraged to cut the forest down.