Monthly deforestation, degradation, and wildfire scar data for the Brazilian Amazon

Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) publishes land use change data on a monthly basis using its DETER-B system (Sistema de Detecção do Desmatamento na Amazônia Legal em Tempo Real). Below is a table with the monthly data since the system went public in August 2016. All figures are square kilometers.

Last update: 2024-Feb-17

Month Deforestation Degradation Deforestation with Exposed Soil Deforestation with Vegetation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut Type 1+2
Aug 2016 1025.1 1673.8 1009.7 13.1 2.3 9285.8 539.5
Sep 2016 691.4 472.2 687.1 1.4 3.0 4244.3 275.9
Oct 2016 749.8 899.7 739.0 1.9 8.9 4081.9 292.0
Nov 2016 367.1 354.1 363.2 2.2 1.6 569.1 147.5
Dec 2016 16.5 8.5 16.5 0.0 0.0 13.5 0.0
Jan 2017 58.2 14.3 58.2 0.0 0.0 10.2 0.0
Feb 2017 101.3 12.2 101.2 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.2
Mar 2017 74.2 23.2 73.6 0.2 0.4 5.2 0.5
Apr 2017 126.9 40.1 121.3 4.0 1.6 2.9 0.7
May 2017 363.5 128.3 340.3 7.8 15.4 4.1 61.1
Jun 2017 608.3 128.2 504.0 84.8 19.4 75.0 53.6
Jul 2017 457.7 156.6 407.9 47.5 2.3 40.0 131.1
Aug 2017 289.1 278.0 286.9 0.8 1.4 101.6 262.1
Sep 2017 411.4 339.5 409.5 0.0 1.9 7757.8 165.7
Oct 2017 456.5 427.6 452.9 0.6 3.0 6857.8 178.4
Nov 2017 359.7 199.9 352.9 3.1 3.6 1843.2 398.4
Dec 2017 293.7 264.5 284.3 4.9 4.4 1152.0 125.2
Jan 2018 182.6 206.6 149.6 27.3 5.7 1589.7 71.9
Feb 2018 146.3 96.2 139.0 6.9 0.4 406.6 0.0
Mar 2018 356.6 246.1 318.4 33.7 4.4 507.5 110.6
Apr 2018 489.5 280.3 428.0 51.8 9.7 710.6 95.8
May 2018 549.9 239.8 452.1 78.2 19.5 313.2 130.7
Jun 2018 488.2 569.1 407.0 66.9 14.3 467.5 218.9
Jul 2018 596.3 700.9 562.4 24.1 9.8 199.0 188.0
Aug 2018 525.9 325.7 494.6 22.2 9.1 616.3 130.6
Sep 2018 746.0 306.5 728.6 12.2 5.3 1294.4 372.6
Oct 2018 526.2 196.5 505.7 13.8 6.7 136.2 135.2
Nov 2018 276.9 66.3 271.5 5.2 0.2 12.3 124.0
Dec 2018 67.2 8.4 63.5 3.4 0.4 0.0 9.3
Jan 2019 136.1 49.4 130.6 4.9 0.6 33.9 42.7
Feb 2019 138.1 19.8 118.6 14.2 5.3 18.1 8.6
Mar 2019 251.48 41.63 233.81 16.09 1.58 473.44 48.26
Apr 2019 247.39 70.25 229.79 13.91 3.69 679.78 9.32
May 2019 738.56 60.91 623.06 81.03 34.47 58.38 57.53
Jun 2019 934.81 58.48 854.27 67.98 12.56 656.94 183.74
Jul 2019 2255.33 520.55 2005.49 225.86 23.98 722.68 389.26
Aug 2019 1714.31 374.96 1675.38 32.08 6.85 1380.99 847.91
Sep 2019 1453.64 331.04 1436.15 13.65 3.84 3851.01 599.54
Oct 2019 555.27 313.29 545.64 6.66 2.97 516.74 217.35
Nov 2019 562.8 101.27 548.56 7.17 7.07 151.8 490.54
Dec 2019 189.94 29.14 183.37 4.04 2.53 13.99 46.13
Jan 2020 284.28 89.27 264.49 14.69 5.1 7.83 173.67
Feb 2020 185.73 13.07 180.04 1.71 3.98 14.07 62.8
Mar 2020 326.94 23.51 317.79 5.46 3.69 1.88 0.8
Apr 2020 407.2 27.34 392.86 8.95 5.39 14.53 27.59
May 2020 833.57 18.41 802.64 23.25 7.68 19.16 54.04
Jun 2020 1043.23 167.81 923.83 97.55 21.85 12.76 138.24
Jul 2020 1658.97 328.48 1578.53 56.79 23.65 287.25 717.31
Aug 2020 1353.89 241.49 1330.36 7.74 15.79 773.7 854.66
Sep 2020 962.55 204.75 952.03 3.32 7.2 9824.12 623.59
Oct 2020 835.72 252.12 832.14 0.84 2.74 3358.84 680.26
Nov 2020 309.76 87.83 305.53 3.68 0.55 731.23 148.76
Dec 2020 215.42 49.18 212.02 0.9 2.5 127.36 69.85
Jan 2021 82.88 21.19 82.31 0 0.57 32.43 17.1
Feb 2021 122.8 7.14 120.59 0 2.21 6.52 19.99
Mar 2021 367.61 34.87 361.15 0.29 6.17 22.62 25.06
Apr 2021 579.98 54.59 561.41 8.7 9.87 23.86 73.43
May 2021 1390.12 232.63 1302.88 49.3 37.94 26.65 284.99
Jun 2021 1061.37 243.65 1006.49 30.41 24.47 190.35 470.97
Jul 2021 1497.93 367.28 1468.61 13.3 16.02 117.73 733.7
Aug 2021 918.24 323.08 907.03 4.01 7.2 948.18 602.94
Sep 2021 984.61 338 977.05 1.07 6.49 1216.65 1111.23
Oct 2021 876.56 214.42 862.83 5.21 8.52 556.25 676.63
Nov 2021 249.49 59.31 247.58 1.37 0.54 43.12 71.87
Dec 2021 87.19 10.45 85.88 0 1.31 0.94 19.05
Jan 2022 430.44 47.17 426.96 0 3.48 26.43 99.14
Feb 2022 198.67 13.75 195.74 0.46 2.47 7.21 8.72
Mar 2022 312.23 25.2 309.36 0.4 2.47 11.03 16.33
Apr 2022 1026.35 123.44 1012.82 4.67 8.86 14.5 49.88
May 2022 899.64 108.02 884 6.19 9.45 1.22 108.8
Jun 2022 1120.2 93.18 1103.29 5.14 11.77 3.04 277
Jul 2022 1486.71 354.7 1405.85 68.88 11.98 3212.02 1308.24
Aug 2022 1661.02 347.12 1640.01 15.22 5.79 5668.93 575.83
Sep 2022 1454.76 353.71 1453.25 0.25 1.26 1962.87 647.88
Oct 2022 903.86 732.27 902.2 0.11 1.55 401.12 317.22
Nov 2022 554.66 118.3 549.76 0.59 4.31 399.57 424.34
Dec 2022 229.07 17.37 227.16 0.84 1.07 36.62 45.93
Jan 2023 166.58 7.62 162.27 2.43 1.88 24.68 8.24
Feb 2023 321.97 45.33 312.13 0.69 9.15 24.18 21.28
Mar 2023 356.14 34.79 335.36 10.5 10.28 21.57 79.31
Apr 2023 328.71 76.06 300.01 21.7 7 26.25 42.59
May 2023 812.32 170.12 544.33 256.05 11.94 49.98 591.6
Jun 2023 663 162.29 483.74 158.66 20.6 87.74 366.88
Jul 2023 499.91 248.54 442.57 47.5 9.84 42.89 770.16
Aug 2023 563.09 491.63 547.68 8.89 6.52 942.37 632.09
Sep 2023 629.32 714.74 613.51 0.81 15 1106.01 1064.73
Oct 2023 434.56 568.06 429.15 0.84 4.57 2366.51 683.49
Nov 2023 201.1 216.15 200.21 0.24 0.65 2126.17 172.68
Dec 2023 176.8 125.69 174.18 0.38 2.24 1446.74 218.89
Jan 2024 118.86 17.45 109.97 7.53 1.36 314.49 52.98

 


 

  • Locals at the mouth of the Amazon River get a salty taste of climate change

    - Ocean rise and changes in the Amazon River are ruining the way of life in an archipelago close to where the Amazon River runs into the Atlantic.- In Bailique, locals are experiencing longer periods of salty water, a natural phenomenon that is becoming more usual due to climate change.- Açaí berries, the prime economic drive of the community, are becoming saltier, and palm trees are being eaten by the erosion caused by changes in the Amazon River’s flow.- Part of the population has already left the region, as others struggle to adapt to the new landscape.

  • To reverse deforestation and protect biodiversity, build a bioeconomy in the Amazon (commentary)

    - Slowing and reversing deforestation and land degradation in the Amazon requires not only conservation efforts but also increasing the economic value of standing primary forests through a bioeconomy approach, argues Robert Muggah, co-founder of Instituto Igarapé.- A bioeconomy involves regenerative agriculture, sustainable energy, and other activities that leverage the forest’s natural assets while ensuring economic benefits for local communities. However, the expansion of the bioeconomy faces challenges, including resistance from extractive sectors, investment risks, and the need for infrastructure, research, and support for local enterprises.- Despite these hurdles, advancing the bioeconomy is essential for sustainable development and decarbonization in the Amazon and crucial for the world, says Muggah.- This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the authors, not necessarily Mongabay.

  • Megafires are spreading in the Amazon — and they are here to stay

    - Wildfires consuming more than 100 square kilometers (38 square miles) of tropical rainforest shouldn’t happen, yet they are becoming more and more frequent.      - Because of its intense humidity and tall trees, fire does not occur spontaneously in the Amazon; usually accidental, forest fires are caused by uncontrolled small fires coming from crop burning, livestock management or clear-cutting.- Scientists say the rainforest is becoming increasingly flammable, even in areas not directly related to deforestation; fire is now spreading faster and higher, reaching more than 10 meters (32 feet) in height.

  • Brazil’s BR-319 highway: The danger reaches a critical moment (commentary)

    - A project to rebuild Brazil’s notorious BR-319 highway is quickly moving closer to becoming a fait accompli. Together with planned side roads, BR-319 would open vast areas of Amazon rainforest to the entry of deforesters. A working group convened by the Ministry of Transportation will soon release a report intended to justify approval of the project’s environmental license. Congressional approval of legislation to force granting the license is also looming.- Despite a constant political discourse claiming that governance will contain deforestation and tourists will admire the forest from their cars as they drive on a “park road,” the reality on an Amazon frontier is very different. Most of what happens once access is provided by road is outside of the government’s control.- The consequences of unleashing deforestation in the last great block of Amazon forest would be catastrophic for Brazil, threatening the water carried to São Paulo by the winds known as “flying rivers” and pushing global warming past a tipping point.- An earlier version of this text was published in Portuguese by Amazônia Real. It is a commentary and does not necessarily reflect the views of Mongabay.

  • Critics decry controversial bill that loosens deforestation restrictions in Peru

    - On Jan. 10, Peru’s Congress approved a new amendment to the country’s forest and wildlife law, which loosens restrictions on deforestation and may affect the rights of Indigenous peoples, experts warn.- According to opponents of this amendment, this change in legislation could pave the way for a large expansion of deforestation across Peru’s forests, with the Amazon at risk.- Proponents of the bill argue that it will bring stability to the Peruvian agricultural sector and offer legal security to those dedicated to agricultural production.- A group of civil society organizations and lawyers have filed a motion with the Constitutional Court, arguing the new revision violated the Constitution.

  • Brazil’s 2024-2027 “Transversal Environmental Agenda”: The elephants in the room (commentary)

    - Brazil’s current 4-year development plan is accompanied by a “Transversal Environmental Agenda,” released last week, to coordinate environmental measures across the different federal agencies.- While the agenda lists many worthwhile items in the portfolios of the various ministries, it fails in the most basic role such an agenda should play: ensuring that government actions do not cause environmental catastrophes.- Missing subjects include foregoing building roads that open Amazon forest to deforestation, legalizing illegal land claims that stimulates an unending cycle of land grabbing and invasion, plans for hydroelectric dams in Amazonia, expanding oil and gas drilling and the burning of fossil fuels that must end without delay if global warming is to be controlled.- An earlier version of this text was published in Portuguese by Amazônia Real. It is a commentary and does not necessarily reflect the views of Mongabay.

  • Grassroots efforts and an Emmy-winning film help Indigenous fight in Brazil

    - The 2022 documentary “The Territory” won an Emmy award this January, shining a light on the Uru-eu-wau-wau Indigenous people and the invasions, conflicts and threats from land grabbers in their territory in the Brazilian Amazon from 2018 to 2021.- After years of increasing invasions and deforestation in the protected area, experts say the situation has slowly improved in the past three years, and both Indigenous and government officials in the region “feel a little safer.”- Grassroots surveillance efforts, increased visibility of the problems, and a more effective federal crackdown against invaders have helped tackle illegal land occupiers and allowed the Indigenous populations to take their land back.- Despite the security improvements, however, the territory still struggles against invasions and deforestation within the region, experts say.

  • Climate change made 2023 Amazon drought 30 times more likely, scientists say

    - A new report from World Weather Attribution (WWA) estimates that climate change increased the likelihood of the 2023 Amazon drought by a factor of 30.- Both El Niño and climate change contributed to the lack of rainfall in the region, but climate change also led to extremely high temperatures and increased water evaporation.- In a world 2° Celsius (3.6° Fahrenheit) warmer than preindustrial levels, similar or worse droughts will likely occur in the region every 10-15 years.

  • Lula’s ambitious green agenda runs up against Congress’s agribusiness might

    - With reduced support in Brazil’s Congress following the 2022 elections, the administration of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva has been unable to prevent the passage of bills dismantling environmental safeguards in favor of agribusiness interests.- Throughout 2023, the agribusiness caucus managed to push through legislation undermining Indigenous rights to land and slashing regulations on pesticides.- The same election that brought Lula back to power in Brazil also led to a conservative Congress that’s more right-wing, better-organized, and aware of its powers, according to experts.- One bright spot is a drop in Amazon Rainforest deforestation, a headline figure for Lula’s international diplomacy; but more progress is needed to give Brazil a prominent place in international environmental advocacy, experts say.

  • Why the Amazon’s small streams have a major impact on its grand rivers

    - An unprecedented time-series study in the basin of the Tapajós River, a major tributary of the Amazon, assesses the level of degradation of small rivers threatened by agribusiness expansion.- Researchers from several universities will assess the conservation status of 100 streams spread between the municipalities of Santarém and Paragominas, at the confluence of the Tapajós and the Amazon, which were first analyzed in 2010.- The impact of dirt roads and their network of river crossings, which causes sediment load, siltation, erosion and changes in water quality, was one of the factors that caught researchers’ attention in the initial time-series study.- Experts say that local development models should ideally start from water to land, rather than the other way around, given the importance of water for the rainforest, its biodiversity, and the inhabitants who depend on both.