Monthly deforestation, degradation, and wildfire scar data for the Brazilian Amazon

Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) publishes land use change data on a monthly basis using its DETER-B system (Sistema de Detecção do Desmatamento na Amazônia Legal em Tempo Real). Below is a table with the monthly data since the system went public in August 2016. All figures are square kilometers.

Last update: 2022-Aug-20

Month Deforestation Degradation Deforestation with Exposed Soil Deforestation with Vegetation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut Type 1+2
Aug 2016 1025.1 1673.8 1009.7 13.1 2.3 9285.8 539.5
Sep 2016 691.4 472.2 687.1 1.4 3.0 4244.3 275.9
Oct 2016 749.8 899.7 739.0 1.9 8.9 4081.9 292.0
Nov 2016 367.1 354.1 363.2 2.2 1.6 569.1 147.5
Dec 2016 16.5 8.5 16.5 0.0 0.0 13.5 0.0
Jan 2017 58.2 14.3 58.2 0.0 0.0 10.2 0.0
Feb 2017 101.3 12.2 101.2 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.2
Mar 2017 74.2 23.2 73.6 0.2 0.4 5.2 0.5
Apr 2017 126.9 40.1 121.3 4.0 1.6 2.9 0.7
May 2017 363.5 128.3 340.3 7.8 15.4 4.1 61.1
Jun 2017 608.3 128.2 504.0 84.8 19.4 75.0 53.6
Jul 2017 457.7 156.6 407.9 47.5 2.3 40.0 131.1
Aug 2017 289.1 278.0 286.9 0.8 1.4 101.6 262.1
Sep 2017 411.4 339.5 409.5 0.0 1.9 7757.8 165.7
Oct 2017 456.5 427.6 452.9 0.6 3.0 6857.8 178.4
Nov 2017 359.7 199.9 352.9 3.1 3.6 1843.2 398.4
Dec 2017 293.7 264.5 284.3 4.9 4.4 1152.0 125.2
Jan 2018 182.6 206.6 149.6 27.3 5.7 1589.7 71.9
Feb 2018 146.3 96.2 139.0 6.9 0.4 406.6 0.0
Mar 2018 356.6 246.1 318.4 33.7 4.4 507.5 110.6
Apr 2018 489.5 280.3 428.0 51.8 9.7 710.6 95.8
May 2018 549.9 239.8 452.1 78.2 19.5 313.2 130.7
Jun 2018 488.2 569.1 407.0 66.9 14.3 467.5 218.9
Jul 2018 596.3 700.9 562.4 24.1 9.8 199.0 188.0
Aug 2018 525.9 325.7 494.6 22.2 9.1 616.3 130.6
Sep 2018 746.0 306.5 728.6 12.2 5.3 1294.4 372.6
Oct 2018 526.2 196.5 505.7 13.8 6.7 136.2 135.2
Nov 2018 276.9 66.3 271.5 5.2 0.2 12.3 124.0
Dec 2018 67.2 8.4 63.5 3.4 0.4 0.0 9.3
Jan 2019 136.1 49.4 130.6 4.9 0.6 33.9 42.7
Feb 2019 138.1 19.8 118.6 14.2 5.3 18.1 8.6
Mar 2019 251.48 41.63 233.81 16.09 1.58 473.44 48.26
Apr 2019 247.39 70.25 229.79 13.91 3.69 679.78 9.32
May 2019 738.56 60.91 623.06 81.03 34.47 58.38 57.53
Jun 2019 934.81 58.48 854.27 67.98 12.56 656.94 183.74
Jul 2019 2255.33 520.55 2005.49 225.86 23.98 722.68 389.26
Aug 2019 1714.31 374.96 1675.38 32.08 6.85 1380.99 847.91
Sep 2019 1453.64 331.04 1436.15 13.65 3.84 3851.01 599.54
Oct 2019 555.27 313.29 545.64 6.66 2.97 516.74 217.35
Nov 2019 562.8 101.27 548.56 7.17 7.07 151.8 490.54
Dec 2019 189.94 29.14 183.37 4.04 2.53 13.99 46.13
Jan 2020 284.28 89.27 264.49 14.69 5.1 7.83 173.67
Feb 2020 185.73 13.07 180.04 1.71 3.98 14.07 62.8
Mar 2020 326.94 23.51 317.79 5.46 3.69 1.88 0.8
Apr 2020 407.2 27.34 392.86 8.95 5.39 14.53 27.59
May 2020 833.57 18.41 802.64 23.25 7.68 19.16 54.04
Jun 2020 1043.23 167.81 923.83 97.55 21.85 12.76 138.24
Jul 2020 1658.97 328.48 1578.53 56.79 23.65 287.25 717.31
Aug 2020 1353.89 241.49 1330.36 7.74 15.79 773.7 854.66
Sep 2020 962.55 204.75 952.03 3.32 7.2 9824.12 623.59
Oct 2020 835.72 252.12 832.14 0.84 2.74 3358.84 680.26
Nov 2020 309.76 87.83 305.53 3.68 0.55 731.23 148.76
Dec 2020 215.42 49.18 212.02 0.9 2.5 127.36 69.85
Jan 2021 82.88 21.19 82.31 0 0.57 32.43 17.1
Feb 2021 122.8 7.14 120.59 0 2.21 6.52 19.99
Mar 2021 367.61 34.87 361.15 0.29 6.17 22.62 25.06
Apr 2021 579.98 54.59 561.41 8.7 9.87 23.86 73.43
May 2021 1390.12 232.63 1302.88 49.3 37.94 26.65 284.99
Jun 2021 1061.37 243.65 1006.49 30.41 24.47 190.35 470.97
Jul 2021 1497.93 367.28 1468.61 13.3 16.02 117.73 733.7
Aug 2021 918.24 355.08 907.03 4.01 7.2 986.25 602.94
Sep 2021 984.61 346.11 977.05 1.07 6.49 1222.28 1112.34
Oct 2021 876.56 220.66 862.83 5.21 8.52 558.37 677.44
Nov 2021 249.49 61.24 247.58 1.37 0.54 43.12 72.91
Dec 2021 87.19 10.92 85.88 0 1.31 0.94 19.05
Jan 2022 430.44 49.84 426.96 0 3.48 26.49 99.14
Feb 2022 198.67 16.72 195.74 0.46 2.47 7.21 8.72
Mar 2022 312.23 38.89 309.36 0.4 2.47 11.03 16.33
Apr 2022 1026.35 160.17 1012.82 4.67 8.86 14.72 49.99
May 2022 899.64 160.41 884 6.19 9.45 1.22 114.58
Jun 2022 1120.2 154.5 1103.29 5.14 11.77 3.04 278.28
Jul 2022 1486.71 521.74 1405.85 68.88 11.98 772.88 1319.96

 


 

  • Road network spreads ‘arteries of destruction’ across 41% of Brazilian Amazon

    - A groundbreaking study using satellite data and an artificial intelligence algorithm shows how the spread of unofficial roads throughout the Amazon is driving widespread deforestation.- One such road is on the verge of cutting across the Xingu Socioenvironmental Corridor, posing a serious risk of helping push the Amazon beyond a crucial tipping point.- Unprotected public lands account for 25% of the total illegal road network, with experts saying the creation of more protected areas could stem the spread and slow both deforestation and land grabs.- Officially sanctioned roads, such as the Trans-Amazonian Highway, also need better planning to minimize their impact and prevent the growth of illegal offshoots, experts say.

  • How close is the Amazon tipping point? Forest loss in the east changes the equation

    - Scientists warn that the Amazon is approaching a tipping point beyond which it would begin to transition from a lush tropical forest into a dry, degraded savanna. This point may be reached when 25% of the forest is lost.- In a newly released report, the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) estimates that 13.2% of the original Amazon forest biome has been lost due to deforestation and other causes.- However, when the map is divided into thirds, it shows that 31% of the eastern Amazon has been lost. Moisture cycles through the forest from east to west, creating up to half of all rainfall across the Amazon. The 31% figure is critical, the report says, “because the tipping point will likely be triggered in the east.”- Experts say the upcoming elections in Brazil could have dramatic consequences for the Amazon, and to avert the tipping point we must lower emissions, undertake ambitious reforestation projects, and build an economy based on the standing forest. Granting and honoring Indigenous land tenure and protected areas are also key strategies.

  • European bill passes to ban imports of deforestation-linked commodities

    - Imports of 14 types of commodities into the European Union will soon have to be verified for possible association with deforestation in the countries in which they were produced.- That’s the key provision in a bill passed on Sept. 13 by the European Parliament, which initially targeted soy, beef, palm oil, timber, cocoa, and coffee, but now also includes pork, lamb and goat meat, as well as poultry, corn, rubber, charcoal, and printed paper.- The bill still needs the approval of the Council of the EU and the national parliaments of the 27 countries in the bloc, but is already considered a historic step against deforestation.- In Brazil, experts have welcomed the bill as a means of tackling the demand-side pressures driving increasing levels of deforestation in the Amazon Rainforest, while the agribusiness lobby has denounced it as unfair.

  • Bolsonaro trails in polls, but his base in Congress looks likely to persist

    - With Brazil’s presidential election scheduled for Oct. 2, environmental activists have expressed hope that a turning point in favor of nature could be just weeks away if Jair Bolsonaro loses.- But two-thirds of the current lower house of Congress voted for anti-environmental bills, and experts predict that the profile of the lawmakers will remain right-wing and pro-agribusiness.- Deforestation in the Amazon rose to its highest levels in 10 years under Bolsonaro, who vowed to open up the rainforest to agriculture and mining.- However, experts say a greener agenda could be possible depending on who is appointed the next lower and upper house presidents, a decision that will be made early next year.

  • Amazon deforestation in Brazil booms in August

    - Rainforest destruction in the Brazilian Amazon jumped 11% in August with deforestation reaching 1,661 square kilometers (641 square miles) — an area more than 28 times the size of Manhattan — according to data released today by Brazil’s national space research agency, INPE.- The tally brings rainforest clearing detected in the Brazilian Amazon since the beginning of the year by INPE’s deforestation alert system to 7,135 square kilometers, the highest on record dating back to 2008.- About 80% of August’s deforestation occurred in just three states: Para (41%), Mato Grosso (20%), and Amazonas (19%).- Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon has been trending higher since 2012 and has especially accelerated since 2019, when Jair Bolsonaro became president.

  • Illegal logging and trade in fine wood threaten Wampis communities in the Peruvian Amazon

    - More than 20,000 board feet of protected forest species, such as cedar and mahogany, are being lost from forests inhabited by Wampis communities every month, according to estimates by community leaders.- The extraction and sale of these fine woods have increased since the start of 2022 after two Wampis communities obtained permits for the use of certain forest resources.- According to Wampis leaders, since the issuing of the permits to the two communities, loggers have been able to cut down and transport cedar and mahogany wood, despite these trees being protected species.

  • Brazil faces two contrasting legacies for the Amazon in October’s elections

    - Polls indicate that Brazil’s presidential election in October will go to a runoff between incumbent Jair Bolsonaro and former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, in a duel likely to decide the fate of the Amazon Rainforest.- While Bolsonaro doubles down his climate change denialism and anti-Indigenous agenda, Lula vows to tackle deforestation and eject criminals from the Amazon.- Under Bolsonaro, the Brazilian Amazon has lost an area of forest larger than Belgium and recorded its highest deforestation rate in the last 15 years.- Lula’s policies helped reduce annual deforestation by 82%, to the lowest rate recorded since satellite monitoring began.

  • Report lists Indigenous territories under greatest pressure in the Amazon

    - Apyterewa, the territory of the Parakanã people, continues to be the main target of deforestation by land grabbers among the Indigenous territories of the Amazon, a report by Imazon shows.- The advance of land grabbing in the area known as the “deforestation belt” is used as a form of political pressure for reducing and questioning legally recognized areas.- Despite increasing pressure, Indigenous territories still have the lowest deforestation rate among protected areas, proving their effectiveness as a preservation policy.- Indigenous representatives and civil society advocates criticize the federal government for reducing vigilance and putting forward bills to explore Indigenous land.

  • Blazing start to Amazon’s ‘fire season’ as burning hits August record

    - Fires in the Brazilian Amazon surged in August to the highest for the month since 2010, surpassing the blazes in August 2019 that drew global attention.- On Aug. 22 alone, more than 3,300 fire alerts were reported in 24 hours, the worst single-day tally in the Amazon in 15 years.- Researchers say it’s still too early to tell how severe this fire season will be, but what happened in August is an early warning.

  • ‘Brazilians aren’t familiar with the Amazon’: Q&A with Ângela Mendes

    - Environmental activist Ângela Mendes coordinates the Chico Mendes Committee as part of her efforts to keep alive the memory and legacy of her father, a leader of the rubber tapper community and environmental resistance.- In an interview with Mongabay Brasil, Ângela Mendes talks about the role of social networks as a fundamental instrument for resistance in the 21st century.- She also reflects on the culture of impunity that allowed the masterminds of her father’s murder to evade justice, and which she says persists in Brazil today.- But she also holds out hope for change, noting that Brazilians are largely concerned about the environment, but that they need to channel this concern into concrete actions, including in the national elections coming up in October.