Monthly deforestation, degradation, and wildfire scar data for the Brazilian Amazon

Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) publishes land use change data on a monthly basis using its DETER-B system (Sistema de Detecção do Desmatamento na Amazônia Legal em Tempo Real). Below is a table with the monthly data since the system went public in August 2016. All figures are square kilometers.

Last update: 2020-May-15

Month Degradation Deforestation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut
Aug 2016 1673.8 1022.8 2.3 9285.8 539.5
Sep 2016 472.2 688.4 3 4244.3 275.9
Oct 2016 899.7 741 8.9 4081.9 292
Nov 2016 354.1 365.5 1.6 569.1 147.5
Dec 2016 8.5 16.5 13.5 0
Jan 2017 14.3 58.2 10.2 0
Feb 2017 12.2 101.2 0.1 1.2
Mar 2017 23.2 73.8 0.4 5.2 0.5
Apr 2017 40.1 125.4 1.6 2.9 0.7
May 2017 128.3 348.1 15.4 4.1 61.1
Jun 2017 128.2 588.9 19.4 75 53.6
Jul 2017 156.6 455.4 2.3 40 131.1
Aug 2017 278 287.7 1.4 101.6 262.1
Sep 2017 339.5 409.5 1.9 7757.8 165.7
Oct 2017 427.6 453.5 3 6857.8 178.4
Nov 2017 199.9 356.1 3.6 1843.2 398.4
Dec 2017 264.5 289.2 4.4 1152 125.2
Jan 2018 247.7 179.2 5.7 1626 63.6
Feb 2018 96.6 151.1 0.4 420.1 0
Mar 2018 253.8 358.2 4.4 534.6 110.6
Apr 2018 289.1 508.1 10.5 854.3 99.8
May 2018 247.5 538 20.6 323.1 131.7
Jun 2018 612.1 504.5 16.3 478.7 223
Jul 2018 737.4 609.5 10.8 212.9 221.1
Aug 2018 355.2 519.6 10.2 793.5 165.2
Sep 2018 373.7 722.7 6 1425.7 448.5
Oct 2018 232.5 490.9 7 156 160.5
Nov 2018 84 265.4 0.2 12.3 125.7
Dec 2018 14.9 66.5 0.5 9.3
Jan 2019 75.4 140.2 0.6 34.5 46.2
Feb 2019 25 130.9 5.8 20.6 12.2
Mar 2019 80.2 242.4 470.5 0
Apr 2019 115.2 237.8 682.5 0
May 2019 197 702.2 34.6 69.7 111
Jun 2019 121.3 919.4 12.7 667.7 202.7
Jul 2019 675.2 2092.4 22.8 753.7 382.5
Aug 2019 481 1695.49 6 1483.99 881
Sep 2019 423.46 1443.54 3.86 4022.95 610.66
Oct 2019 333.6 545.14 2.97 541.81 219.05
Nov 2019 102.1 510.89 5.87 136.08 461.74
Dec 2019 33.9 187.1 2.5 15.0 52.1
Jan 2020 95.8 263.7 5.3 8.0 182.5
Feb 2020 16.2 179.8 4.0 14.3 63.5
Mar 2020 27.9 317.36 3.7 2.3 0.8
Apr 2020 41.24 391.27 5.4 14.8 27.6

 


 

Trailing twelve months of data 

Tracking data on a 12-month basis adjusts for seasonality and is a better indicator of trends than month-to-month data.

Month Degradation Deforestation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut
Jul 2017 3911 4585 55 18332 1503
Aug 2017 2516 3850 54 9148 1226
Sep 2017 2383 3571 53 12661 1116
Oct 2017 1911 3284 47 15437 1002
Nov 2017 1757 3274 49 16711 1253
Dec 2017 2013 3547 54 17850 1378
Jan 2018 2246 3668 59 19466 1441
Feb 2018 2330 3718 59 19886 1440
Mar 2018 2561 4002 64 20415 1550
Apr 2018 2810 4385 72 21267 1649
May 2018 2929 4575 78 21586 1720
Jun 2018 3413 4491 75 21989 1889
Jul 2018 3994 4645 83 22162 1979
Aug 2018 4071 4877 92 22854 1883
Sep 2018 4105 5190 96 16522 2165
Oct 2018 3910 5227 100 9820 2148
Nov 2018 3794 5136 97 7989 1875
Dec 2018 3545 4914 93 6837 1759
Jan 2019 3372 4875 88 5246 1742
Feb 2019 3301 4855 93 4846 1754
Mar 2019 3127 4739 89 4782 1643
Apr 2019 2953 4468 78 4610 1543
May 2019 2903 4633 92 4357 1523
Jun 2019 2412 5048 88 4546 1502
Jul 2019 2350 6530 100 5087 1664
Aug 2019 2475 7706 96 5777 2380
Sep 2019 2525 8427 94 8374 2542
Oct 2019 2626 8488 90 8760 2600
Nov 2019 2644 8739 96 8884 2936
Dec 2019 2663 8860 98 8899 2979
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  • Audio: What can we expect from tropical fire season 2020?

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  • Bolsonaro revives a plan to carve a road through one of Brazil’s last untouched areas

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