Monthly deforestation, degradation, and wildfire scar data for the Brazilian Amazon

Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) publishes land use change data on a monthly basis using its DETER-B system (Sistema de Detecção do Desmatamento na Amazônia Legal em Tempo Real). Below is a table with the monthly data since the system went public in August 2016. All figures are square kilometers.

Last update: 2024-Feb-17

Month Deforestation Degradation Deforestation with Exposed Soil Deforestation with Vegetation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut Type 1+2
Aug 2016 1025.1 1673.8 1009.7 13.1 2.3 9285.8 539.5
Sep 2016 691.4 472.2 687.1 1.4 3.0 4244.3 275.9
Oct 2016 749.8 899.7 739.0 1.9 8.9 4081.9 292.0
Nov 2016 367.1 354.1 363.2 2.2 1.6 569.1 147.5
Dec 2016 16.5 8.5 16.5 0.0 0.0 13.5 0.0
Jan 2017 58.2 14.3 58.2 0.0 0.0 10.2 0.0
Feb 2017 101.3 12.2 101.2 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.2
Mar 2017 74.2 23.2 73.6 0.2 0.4 5.2 0.5
Apr 2017 126.9 40.1 121.3 4.0 1.6 2.9 0.7
May 2017 363.5 128.3 340.3 7.8 15.4 4.1 61.1
Jun 2017 608.3 128.2 504.0 84.8 19.4 75.0 53.6
Jul 2017 457.7 156.6 407.9 47.5 2.3 40.0 131.1
Aug 2017 289.1 278.0 286.9 0.8 1.4 101.6 262.1
Sep 2017 411.4 339.5 409.5 0.0 1.9 7757.8 165.7
Oct 2017 456.5 427.6 452.9 0.6 3.0 6857.8 178.4
Nov 2017 359.7 199.9 352.9 3.1 3.6 1843.2 398.4
Dec 2017 293.7 264.5 284.3 4.9 4.4 1152.0 125.2
Jan 2018 182.6 206.6 149.6 27.3 5.7 1589.7 71.9
Feb 2018 146.3 96.2 139.0 6.9 0.4 406.6 0.0
Mar 2018 356.6 246.1 318.4 33.7 4.4 507.5 110.6
Apr 2018 489.5 280.3 428.0 51.8 9.7 710.6 95.8
May 2018 549.9 239.8 452.1 78.2 19.5 313.2 130.7
Jun 2018 488.2 569.1 407.0 66.9 14.3 467.5 218.9
Jul 2018 596.3 700.9 562.4 24.1 9.8 199.0 188.0
Aug 2018 525.9 325.7 494.6 22.2 9.1 616.3 130.6
Sep 2018 746.0 306.5 728.6 12.2 5.3 1294.4 372.6
Oct 2018 526.2 196.5 505.7 13.8 6.7 136.2 135.2
Nov 2018 276.9 66.3 271.5 5.2 0.2 12.3 124.0
Dec 2018 67.2 8.4 63.5 3.4 0.4 0.0 9.3
Jan 2019 136.1 49.4 130.6 4.9 0.6 33.9 42.7
Feb 2019 138.1 19.8 118.6 14.2 5.3 18.1 8.6
Mar 2019 251.48 41.63 233.81 16.09 1.58 473.44 48.26
Apr 2019 247.39 70.25 229.79 13.91 3.69 679.78 9.32
May 2019 738.56 60.91 623.06 81.03 34.47 58.38 57.53
Jun 2019 934.81 58.48 854.27 67.98 12.56 656.94 183.74
Jul 2019 2255.33 520.55 2005.49 225.86 23.98 722.68 389.26
Aug 2019 1714.31 374.96 1675.38 32.08 6.85 1380.99 847.91
Sep 2019 1453.64 331.04 1436.15 13.65 3.84 3851.01 599.54
Oct 2019 555.27 313.29 545.64 6.66 2.97 516.74 217.35
Nov 2019 562.8 101.27 548.56 7.17 7.07 151.8 490.54
Dec 2019 189.94 29.14 183.37 4.04 2.53 13.99 46.13
Jan 2020 284.28 89.27 264.49 14.69 5.1 7.83 173.67
Feb 2020 185.73 13.07 180.04 1.71 3.98 14.07 62.8
Mar 2020 326.94 23.51 317.79 5.46 3.69 1.88 0.8
Apr 2020 407.2 27.34 392.86 8.95 5.39 14.53 27.59
May 2020 833.57 18.41 802.64 23.25 7.68 19.16 54.04
Jun 2020 1043.23 167.81 923.83 97.55 21.85 12.76 138.24
Jul 2020 1658.97 328.48 1578.53 56.79 23.65 287.25 717.31
Aug 2020 1353.89 241.49 1330.36 7.74 15.79 773.7 854.66
Sep 2020 962.55 204.75 952.03 3.32 7.2 9824.12 623.59
Oct 2020 835.72 252.12 832.14 0.84 2.74 3358.84 680.26
Nov 2020 309.76 87.83 305.53 3.68 0.55 731.23 148.76
Dec 2020 215.42 49.18 212.02 0.9 2.5 127.36 69.85
Jan 2021 82.88 21.19 82.31 0 0.57 32.43 17.1
Feb 2021 122.8 7.14 120.59 0 2.21 6.52 19.99
Mar 2021 367.61 34.87 361.15 0.29 6.17 22.62 25.06
Apr 2021 579.98 54.59 561.41 8.7 9.87 23.86 73.43
May 2021 1390.12 232.63 1302.88 49.3 37.94 26.65 284.99
Jun 2021 1061.37 243.65 1006.49 30.41 24.47 190.35 470.97
Jul 2021 1497.93 367.28 1468.61 13.3 16.02 117.73 733.7
Aug 2021 918.24 323.08 907.03 4.01 7.2 948.18 602.94
Sep 2021 984.61 338 977.05 1.07 6.49 1216.65 1111.23
Oct 2021 876.56 214.42 862.83 5.21 8.52 556.25 676.63
Nov 2021 249.49 59.31 247.58 1.37 0.54 43.12 71.87
Dec 2021 87.19 10.45 85.88 0 1.31 0.94 19.05
Jan 2022 430.44 47.17 426.96 0 3.48 26.43 99.14
Feb 2022 198.67 13.75 195.74 0.46 2.47 7.21 8.72
Mar 2022 312.23 25.2 309.36 0.4 2.47 11.03 16.33
Apr 2022 1026.35 123.44 1012.82 4.67 8.86 14.5 49.88
May 2022 899.64 108.02 884 6.19 9.45 1.22 108.8
Jun 2022 1120.2 93.18 1103.29 5.14 11.77 3.04 277
Jul 2022 1486.71 354.7 1405.85 68.88 11.98 3212.02 1308.24
Aug 2022 1661.02 347.12 1640.01 15.22 5.79 5668.93 575.83
Sep 2022 1454.76 353.71 1453.25 0.25 1.26 1962.87 647.88
Oct 2022 903.86 732.27 902.2 0.11 1.55 401.12 317.22
Nov 2022 554.66 118.3 549.76 0.59 4.31 399.57 424.34
Dec 2022 229.07 17.37 227.16 0.84 1.07 36.62 45.93
Jan 2023 166.58 7.62 162.27 2.43 1.88 24.68 8.24
Feb 2023 321.97 45.33 312.13 0.69 9.15 24.18 21.28
Mar 2023 356.14 34.79 335.36 10.5 10.28 21.57 79.31
Apr 2023 328.71 76.06 300.01 21.7 7 26.25 42.59
May 2023 812.32 170.12 544.33 256.05 11.94 49.98 591.6
Jun 2023 663 162.29 483.74 158.66 20.6 87.74 366.88
Jul 2023 499.91 248.54 442.57 47.5 9.84 42.89 770.16
Aug 2023 563.09 491.63 547.68 8.89 6.52 942.37 632.09
Sep 2023 629.32 714.74 613.51 0.81 15 1106.01 1064.73
Oct 2023 434.56 568.06 429.15 0.84 4.57 2366.51 683.49
Nov 2023 201.1 216.15 200.21 0.24 0.65 2126.17 172.68
Dec 2023 176.8 125.69 174.18 0.38 2.24 1446.74 218.89
Jan 2024 118.86 17.45 109.97 7.53 1.36 314.49 52.98

 


 

  • Deforestation in Earth’s largest rainforest continues to plummet despite a rise in fires

    - Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon dropped to its lowest level since March 2018, according to data from the Brazilian government.- Deforestation for the year to date is down 40% compared to 2023, with expectations for a significant annual decline when the “deforestation year” concludes on July 31.- Despite declining deforestation in the Amazon, the region is experiencing a rise in forest fires due to a severe drought.- Deforestation is rising in the cerrado, an adjacent ecosystem.

  • In Peru’s Madre de Dios, deforestation from mining brings huge economic losses

    - Amazon Conservation’s Monitoring of the Amazon Project (MAAP) analyzed the environmental and economic impact of three local communities in the Madre Dios region of the Peruvian Amazon, where gold mining has torn apart the rainforest and created a public health crisis for residents.- Results showed that across just three native communities, deforestation from mining and pollution caused a total economic loss of $593,786,943 only between August 2022 and 2023.- The project was carried out using the Mining Impacts Calculator, a tool created by the Conservation Strategy Fund (CSF) to quantify the economic impact of environmental damage.

  • The harsh, dangerous gig of seizing thousands of illegal cattle in the Amazon

    - President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s administration has removed thousands of cattle from illegal areas in the Amazon, but the task is far from the end; only in Pará state, more than 217,000 animals have been illegally moved from protected areas in the past four years.- Raids to remove these cattle herds are logistically challenging, involving long distances, many personnel, life threats and even traps left in the middle of dirt roads.- Tracking illegal cattle is only possible through the GTA, a document issued by state agencies and overseen by the federal government, but even environmental agencies have trouble accessing this information.

  • Landmark ruling in Suriname grants protections to local and Indigenous communities — for now

    - A court in Suriname approved an injunction filed on behalf of twelve Indigenous and maroon groups concerned about losing approximately 535,000 hectares (1,322,013 acres) of rainforest to agricultural development.- The court said the government doesn’t have the right to grant land without free, prior and informed consent, a process in which developers meet with residents to explain how projects would impact daily life.- Despite the ruling, there are new efforts to bring Mennonite communities from other parts of the region to develop Suriname’s agricultural industry.

  • Weak banking regulations leave two-thirds of Amazon vulnerable to oil and gas

    - A joint investigation by several conservation groups looked at more than 560 financial transactions involving more than 280 banks and 80 oil and gas companies with activities in the Amazon.- It concluded that what the banks claim to be doing for the environment is far different from the “true impacts of their policies.”- Some of the biggest bankrollers of oil and gas (Citibank, JPMorgan Chase, Itaú Unibanco, Santander, Bank of America) only apply their policies to about a third of the rainforest, leaving the rest vulnerable to potential environmental destruction.- The report said banks need to end their relationships with all oil and gas companies in the Amazon if countries in the region are going to protect 80% of the rainforest by 2025.

  • Verra suspends carbon credit projects following police raid in Brazil

    - Verra, the largest registry of the voluntary carbon market, suspended projects targeted by the Federal Police in the Brazilian Amazon following an investigation by Mongabay.- The “extraordinary action” prevents the selling of new credits, the organization stated.- The raid occurred two weeks after Mongabay showed the links between the REDD+ projects and a suspected logging scam.- Verra certified projects that had credits bought by top brands such as the carbon credit broker Moss, the Brazilian low-cost carrier GOL Airlines, the food delivery app iFood, Itaú, one of the country’s leading banks, and the international companies Toshiba, Spotify and Boeing.

  • 2 years after Bruno & Dom’s murders, Amazon region still rife with gangs

    - Brazilian Indigenous expert Bruno Pereira and British journalist Dom Phillips were shot to death on June 5, 2022, launching outcries and a wave of attention on the Javari Valley.- The region, near the tri-border area of Brazil, Peru and Colombia, has been beset by gangs that profit from drug trafficking, illegal logging and fishing, and land-grabbing.- Friends, relatives and Indigenous organizations now say the international uproar wasn’t enough to curtail local crime.

  • Brazil police raid Amazon carbon credit projects exposed by Mongabay

    - The Brazilian Federal Police arrested people and seized assets linked to some of the country’s largest carbon credit projects.- According to the investigators, the group was running land-grabbing and timber laundering crimes in the Amazon for more than a decade and profiting millions of dollars.- The projects were exposed at the end of May in a one-year investigation published by Mongabay, which showed links between the REDD+ projects and an illegal timber scam.- Authorities and experts hope the findings will raise the bar for projects in the country and persuade lawmakers to create strict rules for the Brazilian carbon market, which is now under discussion.

  • New bill to expand farmlands in the Amazon may derail Brazil’s green efforts

    - A bill that would reduce the amount of primary forest that landowners in the Brazilian Amazon must preserve may lead to the deforestation of an area twice the size of Rio de Janeiro state.- The bill has been tailored for the interests of the agribusiness lobby by permitting an increase in legal deforestation and would bring regulation of the Amazon closer to that of the heavily deforested Cerrado savanna biome.- For environmental organizations, its potential approval would undermine Brazil’s stated goals of reducing carbon emissions and putting an end to deforestation by 2030.

  • Governments are ramping up actions to fight environmental crime across the Amazon, but is it working? (commentary)

    - In 2023, Amazon deforestation rates declined after years of record-breaking losses, thanks to efforts led by Brazil and Colombia. However, these gains are fragile, and anti-deforestation efforts show signs of weakening, with persistent risks of a tipping point, argues Robert Muggah, Co-Founder of the Igarapé Institute.- Government measures focus on forest conservation, green development, and strengthening the rule of law but face challenges due to underfunding and limited municipal support. Public security forces are overwhelmed by environmental crimes like illegal mining and wildlife trafficking, exacerbating forest and biodiversity loss.- Environmental crime is gaining more attention from decision-makers, law enforcement, and civil society, leading to increased media coverage and public commitments. Despite this, interventions remain fragmented, with inconsistent political backing and funding, writes Muggah.- “Ultimately, Brazil and other countries in the Amazon Basin cannot reverse environmental crime through police and prosecutions alone,” he writes. “A comprehensive strategy that combines law enforcement with nature-based development opportunities is critical.” This post is a commentary, so the views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay.