Monthly deforestation, degradation, and wildfire scar data for the Brazilian Amazon

Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) publishes land use change data on a monthly basis using its DETER-B system (Sistema de Detecção do Desmatamento na Amazônia Legal em Tempo Real). Below is a table with the monthly data since the system went public in August 2016. All figures are square kilometers.

Last update: 2021-May-12

Month Deforestation Degradation Deforestation with Exposed Soil Deforestation with Vegetation Mining Wildfire scar Selective Cut Type 1+2
Aug 2016 1025.1 1673.8 1009.7 13.1 2.3 9285.8 539.5
Sep 2016 691.4 472.2 687.1 1.4 3.0 4244.3 275.9
Oct 2016 749.8 899.7 739.0 1.9 8.9 4081.9 292.0
Nov 2016 367.1 354.1 363.2 2.2 1.6 569.1 147.5
Dec 2016 16.5 8.5 16.5 13.5 0.0
Jan 2017 58.2 14.3 58.2 10.2 0.0
Feb 2017 101.3 12.2 101.2 0.1 1.2
Mar 2017 74.2 23.2 73.6 0.2 0.4 5.2 0.5
Apr 2017 126.9 40.1 121.3 4.0 1.6 2.9 0.7
May 2017 363.5 128.3 340.3 7.8 15.4 4.1 61.1
Jun 2017 608.3 128.2 504.0 84.8 19.4 75.0 53.6
Jul 2017 457.7 156.6 407.9 47.5 2.3 40.0 131.1
Aug 2017 289.1 278.0 286.9 0.8 1.4 101.6 262.1
Sep 2017 411.4 339.5 409.5 1.9 7757.8 165.7
Oct 2017 456.5 427.6 452.9 0.6 3.0 6857.8 178.4
Nov 2017 359.7 199.9 352.9 3.1 3.6 1843.2 398.4
Dec 2017 293.7 264.5 284.3 4.9 4.4 1152.0 125.2
Jan 2018 184.8 247.7 151.7 27.5 5.7 1626.0 63.6
Feb 2018 151.6 96.6 144.3 6.9 0.4 420.1 0.0
Mar 2018 362.6 253.8 324.3 33.9 4.4 534.6 110.6
Apr 2018 518.7 289.1 445.9 62.2 10.5 854.3 99.8
May 2018 558.6 247.5 457.8 80.1 20.6 323.1 131.7
Jun 2018 520.8 612.1 433.5 71.0 16.3 478.7 223.0
Jul 2018 620.4 737.4 585.5 24.0 10.8 212.9 221.1
Aug 2018 529.9 355.2 497.5 22.1 10.2 793.5 165.2
Sep 2018 728.6 373.7 710.3 12.3 6.0 1425.7 448.5
Oct 2018 497.9 232.5 477.3 13.7 7.0 156.0 160.5
Nov 2018 265.6 84.0 261.4 4.0 0.2 12.3 125.7
Dec 2018 67.0 14.9 63.1 3.4 0.5 9.3
Jan 2019 140.9 75.4 135.4 4.8 0.6 34.5 46.2
Feb 2019 136.7 25.0 116.9 14.0 5.8 20.6 12.2
Mar 2019 242.4 80.2 227.4 15 470.5 0
Apr 2019 237.8 115.2 224.6 13.2 682.5 0
May 2019 736.8 197 619.1 83.1 34.6 69.7 111
Jun 2019 932.1 121.3 849.9 69.5 12.7 667.7 202.7
Jul 2019 2115.2 675.2 1866.3 226.1 22.8 753.7 382.5
Aug 2019 1701.49 481 1665.49 30 6 1483.99 881
Sep 2019 1447.4 423.46 1430.67 12.87 3.86 4022.95 610.66
Oct 2019 554.77 333.6 545.14 6.66 2.97 541.81 219.05
Nov 2019 523.42 102.14 510.89 5.87 6.66 136.08 461.74
Dec 2019 189.52 33.93 183.02 4.05 2.45 15.02 52.1
Jan 2020 283.76 95.76 263.74 14.69 5.33 8.01 182.49
Feb 2020 185.55 16.18 179.84 1.7 4.01 14.25 63.48
Mar 2020 326.51 27.88 317.36 5.46 3.69 2.31 0.8
Apr 2020 405.61 41.24 391.27 8.95 5.39 14.81 27.59
May 2020 829.9 38.49 798.97 23.25 7.68 19.3 63.68
Jun 2020 1034.4 236.05 914.99 97.55 21.86 13.39 147.82
Jul 2020 1654.32 377.08 1573.88 56.79 23.65 293.48 782.44
Aug 2020 1358.78 288.06 1335.11 7.74 15.93 799.35 885.44
Sep 2020 964.45 241.35 953.93 3.32 7.2 9924.31 645.81
Oct 2020 836.23 274.66 832.65 0.84 2.74 3397.53 700.07
Nov 2020 310.35 91.96 306.12 3.68 0.55 734.23 157.35
Dec 2020 216.33 58 212.93 0.9 2.5 127.67 74.98
Jan 2021 85.74 26.73 85.17 0 0.57 32.89 17.1
Feb 2021 124.51 19.06 120.59 1.71 2.21 0 19.99
Mar 2021 162.77 36.68 155.61 0.48 6.68 5.06 43.91
Apr 2021 580.55 92.49 561.98 8.7 9.87 24.52 73.57

 


 

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